Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of

Despite seeming like a relatively stable place, the Earth's surface has changed dramatically over the past 4.6 billion years.Mountains have been built and eroded, continents and oceans have moved great distances, and the Earth has fluctuated from being extremely cold and almost completely covered with ice to being very warm and ice-free.Thus they probably formed at a depth of 100–200 km.Geologists believe that the ones we find must have been transported supersonically to the surface, in extremely violent eruptions through volcanic pipes.For example, based on the primate fossil record, scientists know that living primates evolved from fossil primates and that this evolutionary history took tens of millions of years.By comparing fossils of different primate species, scientists can examine how features changed and how primates evolved through time.The most widely known form of radiometric dating is carbon-14 dating.

After the passage of two half-lives only 0.25 gram will remain, and after 3 half lives only 0.125 will remain etc.But this sediment doesn't typically include the necessary isotopes in measurable amounts.Fossils can't form in the igneous rock that usually does contain the isotopes.Each of them typically exists in igneous rock, or rock made from cooled magma.Fossils, however, form in sedimentary rock -- sediment quickly covers a dinosaur's body, and the sediment and the bones gradually turn into rock.

Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of